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Accommodation & Property>Rents to rise to 2500 a month in Dublin
LirW 12:02 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Kelly, ask the user Samuel T. Cogley about the 1bed he bought during the boom :pac:
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KellyXX 12:07 Yesterday
Originally Posted by LirW:
Kelly, ask the user Samuel T. Cogley about the 1bed he bought during the boom :pac:
Why, is he homeless and penniless now?
Is he in negative equity still?
I'd be interested in the story if he wants to share.
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myshirt 12:28 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Before you start climbing that ladder, make sure it is leaning against the right building, because unfortunately all that is waiting for a lot of people at the top of that ladder is a kick in the stones.

Renting or buying is a consumption choice.
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previous user 15:22 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by stateofflux:
It is nuts..

4 years ago i was renting a big 2 bed georgian apartment in ranelagh for 650pm
now i am in a tiny studio (an eight of the size) paying 950pm.

the funny thing is back then i only had a part time job /casual dole. now i have a decent full time job and decent salary but my disposable income is the same.
That's insanity right there.
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Topgear on Dave 16:09 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by KellyXX:
I wish I had even bought a 1 bed in 2007 tbh.
Anyone I know who did was very stressed out for a good few years during the busy but they are all delighted now, and half way through their mortgages.

A good few have traded up since or are trading up now.
A friend of mine bought an apartment around that time and is still in NE.

Do not underestimate that bit about being "very stressed out for a good few years". It is a very bad thing.

Taking out large mortgages is not to be sneezed at, you literally tie yourself to a property and a debt.

Its not a good idea for everybody.

(and whatever you do, dont listen to the estate agents and their "property ladder" ****e) :cool:
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mrslancaster 16:54 Yesterday (2 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Wanderer78:
I think this thinking is madness, even though I understand your logic. We seriously need to ditch this whole idea of ladders etc, as it generally just all turns into snakes eventually, people need homes, period, our thinking is arse ways about this. Our current debt burden is already unsustainable, we have to stop this madness. I was starting to consider purchasing at the height of the boom, thank bloody god I didn't, what a scam.
as you say people need homes but many people do not rely on the state to provide them.

what madness are you referring to?

if its a choice between renting for the rest of your life or saving to get a deposit & getting a mortgage, IMO it makes more sense to buy and be mortgage free at some point.

what exactly do you think is wrong with a young person or couple getting a foot on the property ladder? or do you think people should be shackled with rent payments for the whole of their life?

who gains from that I wonder..
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pilly 16:58 Yesterday (2 Thanks)
Originally Posted by KellyXX:
It is my considered opinion as a person who fcucked this up and waited too long, that you get on the property later as fast as you possibly can when you start earning. Even if it's a one bed apartment it will do you for some time and you won't get fcucked by rising rents. When it's time to trade up you will have a good chunk of it paid off and it you are lucky will meet a partner who had done the same thing.

One bed roomed apartments are the very ones that people get stuck with in a recession. What use are they if you ever intend having children?
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Joe prim 17:13 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Anthony123123:
Why are high rise buildings not being build? I think it is a case of poor education in the country they don't even look for solutions, just poor bs out of their mouths SAD
Google Ballymun or St Michael's Estate.
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LirW 17:32 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Joe prim:
Google Ballymun or St Michael's Estate.
But Ballymun was basically damned before it was being built because it's the prime example on how to create a ghetto.
Ballymun can't be used as an excuse for not building up. The decision is simple, you either decide to radically undergo changes or you face it that you can't house enough people in 2018 and you f'd up badly in general and be open to companies and tell them to look elsewhere in Ireland or Europe to go.

There was an article on the journal today about Seattle tackling their housing crisis by building multi storey on former detached house plots.
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mrslancaster 17:42 Yesterday
Originally Posted by LirW:
But Ballymun was basically damned before it was being built because it's the prime example on how to create a ghetto.
Ballymun can't be used as an excuse for not building up. The decision is simple, you either decide to radically undergo changes or you face it that you can't house enough people in 2018 and you f'd up badly in general and be open to companies and tell them to look elsewhere in Ireland or Europe to go.

There was an article on the journal today about Seattle tackling their housing crisis by building multi storey on former detached house plots.
did it say how many storeys? maybe the buildings in ballymun & other places were just too high. is there a happy medium that most would be ok with?
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Samuel T. Cogley 17:45 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by LirW:
Kelly, ask the user Samuel T. Cogley about the 1bed he bought during the boom :pac:
Makes €3000 profit* a year, out of neg equity and I bought a 4 bed out in the burbs to produce offspring and complete the circle of life.

It's on a tracker so the mortgage is very low but I won't sell it until I can cash in at least 70K from it. At this rate that'll be this year or next.

*Capital repayment, just about breaks even now without this.

The only thing I'd do differently is not overpay - as in not overpay on top of a boom and yes I probably would buy a 2 bed - lets face it they were throwing money at people in 2006.

EDIT: Would I do it now? Me bollocks would I - trackers are the only thing that save my generation of buyers.
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LirW 17:46 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
3 - 4.

http://www.thejournal.ie/seattle-up-...48300-Feb2018/

It makes a lot of sense.

And Ballymun didn't suffer from the height of the buildings, it suffered from being built without any infrastructure and housing problematic people in one spot and leave them rot there.
My dad lives in another European country on the 6th floor with a few other 7-storey buildings and there aren't any problems whatsoever.
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Bob24 17:46 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by LirW:
But Ballymun was basically damned before it was being built because it's the prime example on how to create a ghetto.
Ballymun can't be used as an excuse for not building up. The decision is simple, you either decide to radically undergo changes or you face it that you can't house enough people in 2018 and you f'd up badly in general and be open to companies and tell them to look elsewhere in Ireland or Europe to go.

There was an article on the journal today about Seattle tackling their housing crisis by building multi storey on former detached house plots.
Yes, it is a common theme in Europe (not just in Ireland) to blame high density housing for social (or antisocial) problems, whereas the issue is that those problems exist already and are just made more visible by high density housing - their source lies elsewhere and scattering people around just makes the problems easier to hide.

People who think high density and high rise causes these problem should visit Hong Kong in particular and other Asian megacities in general. More dense that we'll ever possibly do in Ireland in the foreseeable future and with less of these issues.
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LirW 17:51 Yesterday
I don't know, I grew up in plenty of high density areas and I think since I'm alive I've never heard back home that there are social problems because of high density.
The problems are created when certain ethnic or social groups are housed and left alone to rot away. The way areas like that are built isn't important.
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Mickiemcfist 18:33 Yesterday (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by mrslancaster:
did it say how many storeys? maybe the buildings in ballymun & other places were just too high. is there a happy medium that most would be ok with?
What correlation do you think height & social issues have? Like living at a certain altitude damages brain cells or something?

As said above, ballymuns issue was due to the density of unemployment, little to no infrastructure & nothing for youths to do other than congregate to drink & do drugs
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