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After Hours>I bet you didn't know that this thread would have a part 2
New Home 17:27 27-01-2019 (8 Thanks)
Both Martin Luther King Jr. and Anne Frank were born in 1929.
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Candie 18:44 27-01-2019 (19 Thanks)
Automaticity is the ability to do everyday things without thinking or with very little conscious consideration of the action. Things like reading, speaking or making the bed can be acomplished with a high degree of automaticity, and most of us complete many tasks without any real conscious thought about what we're doing as these skills are embedded in habit and repetition. Muscle memory requires a great deal of automacity but things like the visual recognition required to read fluently is dependent on the automaticity that comes with learning and practice and repetition as the skills required are consolidated into the background memory processes and frees up the foreground working memory for more focussed tasks and activities.

The higher the cognitive burden, the longer it takes to gain a degree of automaticity. Learning the alphabet or numbers requires a great deal of cognitive input until recognition is completely embedded in memory, and lesser or no conscious input is needed to form words out of letters etc. Things that carry a low cognitive burden like flushing the loo are more easily filed away as something that can be done without thinking through or having to consciously remember. For most, anyway.

Conflicting input can disrupt even long established automaticity, and this was observed in the 1930's when John Ridley Stroop confused people by printing the names of the colors in other colors, and measured how long it took to process the incongruity. When you're cycling along and suddenly hit a small unforseen bump, your procedural memory hiccups for the moment it takes your attention to focus sharply on what's happening, process the interruption, and for normal service to resume.

Research shows that we indulge in behavioural automaticity to soothe ourselves, and take satisfaction and comfort in familiar routines and habits and it plays a part in some obsessive compulsive self-soothing behaviours. Autisic people particularly find ease in familiarity but achieving automaticity is often more difficult as greater sensitivity to stimulation disrupts the formation of ingrained memories needed to be able to take the automatic, sucessful completion of a task for granted. This is why some simple tasks can sometimes be very frustrating, and repetition of others that have been mastered so soothing to those affected.
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stimpson 21:11 27-01-2019 (11 Thanks)
Originally Posted by KevRossi:
This is one of the best threads on Boards.ie, but the first post in the original thread has only received 8 Thanks to date.



Anyway, there are 7 islands that are divided by international borders.

Here they are:

Image
Hans Island is a disputed island that lies between Canada and Greenland that would qualify for this list, if only Denmark and Canada could agree on a boundary.

In the meantime, they are involved the the friendliest border dispute ever. When Danish military go there, they leave a bottle of Schnapps. And when Canadian military forces go there, they leave a bottle of Canadian Club and a sign saying, 'Welcome to Canada.'
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mookishboy 22:16 27-01-2019 (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by OOnegative:
A “jiffy” is an actual unit of time, it’s 1/100th of a second.

a jiffy is about 3 × 10−24 seconds. It has also more informally been defined as "one light-foot"
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Carry 22:26 27-01-2019 (8 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Candie:
Automaticity is the ability to do everyday things without thinking or with very little conscious consideration of the action.
(...)
This is why some simple tasks can sometimes be very frustrating, and repetition of others that have been mastered so soothing to those affected.
After a work related marathon start into the new year and various house related disasters (the bumps in the routine), that made the already bumpy work marathon very frustrating and time consuming, I'm too lazy to read all the posts I have missed. I'm sure I would have thanked loads!

But this one got me out of the rut. Or bumped me mentally up, so to speak.
It's a concept I can anecdotally and empirically confirm.

You can always rely on Candie to post the right thing at the right time ....:D
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mzungu 23:08 27-01-2019 (4 Thanks)
Triskaidekaphobia from the Greek triskaideka, meaning 'thirteen', and phobos, meaning 'fear') is fear or avoidance of the number 13. It is also a reason for the fear of Friday the 13th, called paraskevidekatriaphobia

Funnily enough Steven King has paraskevidekatriaphobia, as did Franklin Roosevelt.
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Capt'n Midnight 00:38 28-01-2019 (2 Thanks)
^^^^
September :eek:
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Junkyard Tom 03:02 28-01-2019 (11 Thanks)
The Channel Tunnel isn't watertight and has to have water pumped out constantly.
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Cookie_Monster 03:43 28-01-2019 (7 Thanks)
Originally Posted by KevRossi:
This is one of the best threads on Boards.ie, but the first post in the original thread has only received 8 Thanks to date.



Anyway, there are 7 islands that are divided by international borders.

Here they are:

snip
France and The Netherlands have an international border on Saint Martin...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Martin
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New Home 11:13 28-01-2019 (28 Thanks)
Image
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ohnonotgmail 15:41 28-01-2019 (19 Thanks)
The last time that there was nobody in the united states or canada on a phone call was August 4th 1922. The funeral of Alexander Graham Bell took place on that day and phone companies silenced all telephone services for 1 minute as a mark of respect.
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Grayson 15:51 28-01-2019 (19 Thanks)
During the 1800's orchestras in europe started increasing their pitch. By mid century it meant that most orchestras were performing pieces a whole tone over what they were written in. It caused some problems, especially for singers. Efforts were made to remedy this but they weren't widely adapted.

So a clause was inserted into the treaty of Versaille (Yes, that treaty of Versaille) required all signatories to adopt the note A as 440hz.


http://mentalfloss.com/article/54743...0-hertz-a-note
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New Home 16:14 28-01-2019 (2 Thanks)
That is mind-blowing! :)
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Grayson 16:23 28-01-2019 (7 Thanks)
There was also a clause which involved the return of an african tribal chiefs skull

Originally Posted by :
ARTICLE 246. Within six months from the coming into force of the present Treaty, ... Germany will hand over to His Britannic Majesty's Government the skull of the Sultan Mkwawa which was removed from the Protectorate of German East Africa and taken to Germany.
The germans had taken it as a trophy from their colony after it's owner, Chief Mkwawa, was defeated during an uprising. When they lost the colony after WW1 the British demanded the return of the skull to prove to the locals that the germans had gone forever and to reward the locals for fighting against the germans in WW1. The germans "lost" the skull and it was only in 1954 that it was returned.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chief_Mkwawa
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Buford T. Justice V 18:18 28-01-2019 (13 Thanks)
Alligators don't hibernate as such but they can employ a technique called brumation to slow their metabolism so they can survive periods of intense cold.

They surface just as the water freezes and poke their snout above the level of the water to enable them to breathe slowly for long periods while their metabolism slows down.


There's some great pics in the article below of a number of alligators in North Carolina.


https://www.foxnews.com/science/alli...urvival-tactic
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