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After Hours>I bet you didn't know that this thread would have a part 2
BaZmO* 19:06 28-01-2019 (4 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Buford T. Justice V:
Alligators don't hibernate as such but they can employ a technique called brumation to slow their metabolism so they can survive periods of intense cold.

They surface just as the water freezes and poke their snout above the level of the water to enable them to breathe slowly for long periods while their metabolism slows down.


There's some great pics in the article below of a number of alligators in North Carolina.


https://www.foxnews.com/science/alli...urvival-tactic
They can also go without eating for up to 3 years. Ultimate survivors.
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Accumulator 19:20 28-01-2019 (6 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Grayson:
So a clause was inserted into the treaty of Versaille (Yes, that treaty of Versaille) required all signatories to adopt the note A as 440hz.
As mentioned regarding this (on the previous thread), there is a bit of a 'conspiracy theory' regarding 440hz, even some blaming the Nazi's on the change.

Many recommend the 'Standard A' pitch should be moved back to 432hz instead. Some of the reasoning ranges from 'cosmic healing powers', and 'pretty structures created by water molecules' when observed vibrating at 432 (octagon re-structuring).

It's all a bit shifty, as even the Schumann Resonance (7.83) only upscales to 430.65 Hz. The '432' is also slightly outside of the Fibonacci sequence, but not by much (55.17241379310345).

Unless you take 8.00hz as a new universal harmonic, then 432 (x55) instead of Schumann's, then there may be something 'in it'.

Basically play you're bongos at 432 (like some ancient instrument tunings), or re-tune (your Rick Astley's Greatest Hists LPs) to play at 98.18181818181804% of normal speed.

- And If it makes you feel good/better: groovy!.
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Candie 19:29 28-01-2019 (32 Thanks)
Native Americans have given much to the world, including the first aquaducts, the game of lacrosse, kayak designs, snowshoes, toboggans, hammocks, igloos and popcorn as well as being the first to cultivate the potato and avocados, even the first solid rubber balls (and ball games), among many other things.

One of those other things was a precursor to modern day aspirin, an effective pain-relieving tea made from willow bark, and Native Americans used drugs like peyote and datura to numb and desensitize patients during surgery and as analgesia in recovery, overseen by specialist healers who served life long apprenticeships in folk medicine.

Another practical thing that indigenous Americans developed was an early model disposable nappy. Animal skins were worked until soft and absorbent and lined with broad plant leaves and topped with dried mosses or grasses, so when the infant needed cleaning the whole shebang could be lifted out of the skin wrapping and discarded, and a new lining of leaves and mosses would be wrapped, loin-cloth style on the baby. Damp mosses and herbs were used to wipe the babies clean and keep them free from irritation and the anti bacterial properties prevented skin infection. Moss was also used to keep babies warm, and 'moss-bags' were the padded baby warmers of the time. An outer lining of soft leathers and inner lining of fabric would be filled with mosses and grasses for insulation, and the baby popped into the moss-bag before being laced into the cradleboard, a rigid structure made of oak by the babies father, complete with spinal support, head protection and a foot plate to prevent slipping. The tight swaddling of the moss-bag and lacing to the cradleboard is something emulated today with commercial baby swaddles and sleeping bags and slings. The dreamcatchers sold to alternative types as some kind of spiritual symbol are simply NA cradle mobiles, toys designed to hang above a cradle for a baby to focus on.

So when people in the 'civilized' nations were having limbs hacked off with dirty instruments by barbers, either fully conscious or black out drunk, many Native American tribes had specially kept instruments, sterilized with steam, used on patients that had been given anesthetics and treated with pain relief afterwards cared for by dedicated healers, and while European children were diapered in rags that weren't washed but rinsed and hung to dry which sometimes led to fatal skin infection, NA babies were being being cleaned with anti inflammatory wipes and changed with single use nappies.
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Wibbs 19:55 28-01-2019 (8 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Candie:
Native Americans have given much to the world, including the first aquaducts, the game of lacrosse, kayak designs, snowshoes, toboggans, hammocks, igloos and popcorn as well as being the first to cultivate the potato and avocados, even the first solid rubber balls (and ball games), among many other things.
While the nappies and some of the medical stuff was Native American C a few in your list were not. The aqueduct was an old world invention well in place in the Middle East and the classical world before the Americas and in Roman hands reached a level of sophistication unmatched until the modern era. Irrigation in general? Nope, again an old world invention. Now some central American cultures did build monumentally cool irrigation systems, but it was much later on. Snowshoes show up in Asia before the Americas. Willow bark infusion was well known and in play since the Mesopotamians, through the Greeks, Romans and Islamic world and continued in usage up until the 20th century. .
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Ipso 20:04 28-01-2019 (1 Thanks)
Wasn't the wheel invented in South America around the same time or even preceding other places? Only problem, is that they had no large beasts of burden to make it more useful.
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Noveight 20:29 28-01-2019 (5 Thanks)
Lisa Robin Kelly, who played Laurie Foreman in That 70's Show, had quite a troubled life. She admitted that a drinking problem forced her to leave the show midway through the 3rd season. After a string of trouble with the law she died in rehab at the age of 43.

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mzungu 21:04 28-01-2019 (4 Thanks)
In Japan, Ronald McDonald is called Donald McDonald due to a lack of a clear "r" sound in Japanese enunciation.
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Squall Leonhart 21:06 28-01-2019 (14 Thanks)
The 1986 music video for hip hop song "Word Up" by Cameo featured LeVar Burton - better known as Lt Cmdr Geordi La Forge from Star Trek: The Next Generation. Song was released a year prior to his Star Trek days.

He also played Kunte Kinte in the 1970s TV drama Roots.
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Squall Leonhart 21:25 28-01-2019 (17 Thanks)
Sticking with a Star Trek theme...

Albert Einstein appeared as a character in 2 episodes of The Next Generation, in 1991 and 1993.

Both times he was played by an Irish actor, one Mr Jim Norton.. Better known in this parish as Bishop Len Brennan from Father Ted!
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Wibbs 22:10 28-01-2019 (10 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Ipso:
Wasn't the wheel invented in South America around the same time or even preceding other places? Only problem, is that they had no large beasts of burden to make it more useful.
Not preceding, but they had the wheel alright. Oddly mostly confined to children's toys.

Image

And the Central Americans cultures had vast networks of really nice roads and they did have beasts of burden, alpaca and the like, even dogs were used extensively, and they were a clever bunch of feckers in so many ways, but for some reason they didn't upscale the wheel. That they already had. Kinda mad. Though it might be as simple as their transport network worked well enough that they thought of it, but also thought why bother?
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New Home 23:03 28-01-2019 (6 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Wibbs:
Not preceding, but they had the wheel alright. Oddly mostly confined to children's toys.

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/a2/bf/1c/a...8045b72b43.jpg

And the Central Americans cultures had vast networks of really nice roads and they did have beasts of burden, alpaca and the like, even dogs were used extensively, and they were a clever bunch of feckers in so many ways, but for some reason they didn't upscale the wheel. That they already had. Kinda mad. Though it might be as simple as their transport network worked well enough that they thought of it, but also thought why bother?
Why use the wheel when you have space ships? :pac: ;)
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LostinBlanch 00:04 29-01-2019 (9 Thanks)
St Maarten, mentioned earlier, has an airport backing onto the beach. It makes for spectacular landings.


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mzungu 00:09 29-01-2019 (4 Thanks)
During the great depression, a group of ladies known as the "book women" delivered books on horseback to rural communities in Appalachia as part of an improving literacy programme. Mode of transport was on horseback and even with the difficult terrain they could cover up to 120 miles in the week, rain, hail or snow.
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Chancer3001 08:12 29-01-2019
In regards to native Americans and them not having access to beasts of burden...

I'm a bit confused. Surely horses are the main beast of burden and they were very plentiful there ?

Or are we talking about inuits or what ?
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Wibbs 08:38 29-01-2019 (2 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Chancer3001:
In regards to native Americans and them not having access to beasts of burden...

I'm a bit confused. Surely horses are the main beast of burden and they were very plentiful there ?

Or are we talking about inuits or what ?
Horses were brought by Europeans. Horses had been present in the Americas but had gone extinct during the last ice age. Done in by a mix of climate change and humans showing up.
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