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After Hours>Frugality and Irish Society
bassy 22:15 11-02-2019
not frugal when it comes to obesity.
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odyssey06 22:15 11-02-2019 (1 Thanks)
I guess if you are French and already have a chateau you probably dont need any more flaunting...
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Mad_maxx 22:23 11-02-2019 (6 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Franz Von Peppercorn:
The 19C called and wants its theories back.
Sure its very un PC to believe religion has in anyway influenced certain societies but the nordic nations might be the poster children for secular liberal nations yet who can seriously deny their inherent Lutheranism which informs their ways?
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nox001 22:25 11-02-2019 (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by n!ghtmancometh:
, buys expensive brand name clothes etc.
I always laugh at this one. Cheap clothes are a terrible false economy. I don't buy clothes that often but when I do I spend the money to buy quality brands and they last vastly longer than cheap stuff.

Originally Posted by Franz Von Peppercorn:
I’ve lived with English people in England. They’re quite happy flaunting wealth.
If you had english people at your wedding you will see what people mean when they say they are tight with money, they give tiny gifts.
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Blaizes 22:29 11-02-2019 (2 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Mrsmum:
I think Irish people as a group have some kind of need to fill up a pit of despair or emptiness within themselves, be it conscious or unconscious, with all forms of 'enjoyment' eg alcohol, constant shopping. We want, want, want all the time and we keep filling up with temporary thrills. It's because we're very insecure and lacking in self esteem imo. People from other countries I think are able to get joy from simpler living. They manage to feel defined by who they are rather than what they have. Very small example but a French lady I know will invite you to her house for lunch and make a big deal about basically some crusty bread and a glass of wine. She is so relaxed she pulls it off beautifully. In reverse no Irish person would invite a guest for lunch and give them a slice of bread. And then there's the whole Danish hygge where if I understand it properly is all about embracing cosy simple pleasures. It's not enough for us here in Ireland to have enough, we want more all the time. Not everyone obviously but I definitely think success in Ireland is measured very much by how much you own.
Think you've really hit the nail on the head, great post.
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Mrsmum 22:33 11-02-2019 (11 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Franz Von Peppercorn:
I’ve lived with English people in England. They’re quite happy flaunting wealth.
Have you ever been to an English wedding. They are all home in bed by midnight if not before after a pretty frugal day. Compare that with Irish weddings which are now three days affairs.
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Calltocall 22:37 11-02-2019 (6 Thanks)
Perhaps I’m missing the point of the article but I lived for a number of years in the UK and one thing that I couldn’t get used to was the tightness/frugality of many people I met, it was the norm, for me personally it’s a real turn off if an individual is extremely tight and penny pinches on everything, it’s a trait I dislike immensely particularly if the individual is wealthy, fair enough if you’re broke but usually people like that are quite wealthy

When I returned home to friends here who would give you the shirt of their backs if you were stuck a rather endearing trait that perhaps has something to do with our casual relationship with money but I would take it any day over my experience abroad, life is short I would rather spend on my family than watch the numbers increase on a computer screen, I don’t recommend reckless spending at all and that has put many people here in trouble but I do believe there is something in the term you can’t take it with you.
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Mad_maxx 22:40 11-02-2019
Women are more frivolous with money as in the heel of the hunt, its the man who will be called upon to provide for the kids, he might have to move into a bedsit but the state will look after her before him
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Ipso 22:42 11-02-2019
Originally Posted by Calltocall:
Perhaps I’m missing the point of the article but I lived for a number of years in the UK and one thing that I couldn’t get used to was the tightness/frugality of many people I met, it was the norm, for me personally it’s a real turn off if an individual is extremely tight and penny pinches on everything, it’s a trait I dislike immensely particularly if the individual is wealthy, fair enough if you’re broke but usually people like that are quite wealthy

When I returned home to friends here who would give you the shirt of their backs if you were stuck a rather endearing trait that perhaps has something to do with our casual relationship with money but I would take it any day over my experience abroad, life is short I would rather spend on my family than watch the numbers increase on a computer screen, I don’t recommend reckless spending at all and that has put many people here in trouble but I do believe there is something in the term you can’t take it with you.
I don't think it's that that is being criticised but more the over extravagance and 'vulgarity".
I lived in Dublin from around 2002 to 2008, it wasn't pretty. I don't think it was a case of Irish people not being frugal back then, more of a case of believing their own hype (richest country in the world etc).
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Mad_maxx 22:42 11-02-2019 (3 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Calltocall:
Perhaps I’m missing the point of the article but I lived for a number of years in the UK and one thing that I couldn’t get used to was the tightness/frugality of many people I met, it was the norm, for me personally it’s a real turn off if an individual is extremely tight and penny pinches on everything, it’s a trait I dislike immensely particularly if the individual is wealthy, fair enough if you’re broke but usually people like that are quite wealthy

When I returned home to friends here who would give you the shirt of their backs if you were stuck a rather endearing trait that perhaps has something to do with our casual relationship with money but I would take it any day over my experience abroad, life is short I would rather spend on my family than watch the numbers increase on a computer screen, I don’t recommend reckless spending at all and that has put many people here in trouble but I do believe there is something in the term you can’t take it with you.
Kiwis are the tightest people I've ever met but then again it's a deeply Presbyterian nation culturally and the most Scottish country in the world outside Scotland

I find it deeply offensive that so many Irish people think that just because someone is well off, they have a duty to cough up, it's an attitude which is rampant here.
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A Tyrant Named Miltiades! 22:43 11-02-2019 (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Franz Von Peppercorn:
That’s not true at all. Savings don’t flow through the economy, only loans add new money, and more transactions obviously mean more economic activity.
Where do you think the loans come from, thin air? These days, any loans drawn down by SMEs are basically drawn from personal savings. This lending did not create new money, only the ECB's asset-purchasing programme did that, and it was never designed to directly help SMEs.

Originally Posted by :
We haven’t proven that Ireland isn’t frugal yet. Savings are high. Reducing wage inflation (except in government) doesn’t seem like a good strategy in a country where wages are not in fact inflating much at all. Wage inflation is what Europe needs.
I totally agree that Germany needs wage inflation, and that Germany has not capitulated this point despite many years of pressure. But ireland does not need wage inflation, certainly not within the manufacturing and export labour markets.

Originally Posted by :
That’s the last thing we want to do as much of economics at Econ 101 level is wrong.
Despite all of the dramatic claims made during the last recession, none of the economics texts have been dramatically rewritten. The fundamentals are intact, except to provide updates to recent events in economic history. Most people who say otherwise tend to be cranks with no interest whatever in economics.
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Franz Von Peppercorn 22:46 11-02-2019 (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Mrsmum:
Have you ever been to an English wedding. They are all home in bed by midnight if not before after a pretty frugal day. Compare that with Irish weddings which are now three days affairs.
I think we’ve been hanging around with different English people. I’m sure some English people have reserved weddings but when I was at my friend’s H and M’s wedding last year it was fairly over the top.
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Mrsmum 22:47 11-02-2019 (11 Thanks)
Compare Santa and Christmas in general here with other countries. We go absolutely nuts spendingwise.
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dxhound2005 22:51 11-02-2019 (1 Thanks)
Originally Posted by Mrsmum:
I think Irish people as a group have some kind of need to fill up a pit of despair or emptiness within themselves, be it conscious or unconscious, with all forms of 'enjoyment' eg alcohol, constant shopping. We want, want, want all the time and we keep filling up with temporary thrills. It's because we're very insecure and lacking in self esteem imo. People from other countries I think are able to get joy from simpler living. They manage to feel defined by who they are rather than what they have. Very small example but a French lady I know will invite you to her house for lunch and make a big deal about basically some crusty bread and a glass of wine. She is so relaxed she pulls it off beautifully. In reverse no Irish person would invite a guest for lunch and give them a slice of bread. And then there's the whole Danish hygge where if I understand it properly is all about embracing cosy simple pleasures. It's not enough for us here in Ireland to have enough, we want more all the time. Not everyone obviously but I definitely think success in Ireland is measured very much by how much you own.
I think I would know if I had a pit of despair or emptiness. It could hardly be unconscious. And I am not insecure, nor lacking in self esteem. Sorry if this does not match your estimation of Irish people as "a group".
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whisky_galore 22:52 11-02-2019 (8 Thanks)
There's a certain amount of a 'keeping up with the Joneses' here, people must have the new car with the new car smell, the bigger dick-waving McMansion than the one down the road, the latest designer furniture etc etc.
You can't be seen dead in an old or a modest house. The wall to wall property wankery in print and tv feeds into this.
Every Christmas has people getting into hock buying stuff they can ill afford because the advertisers tell us we need all this shyte. A live for the moment, worry about the bill tomorrow 'shur it'll be grand' mindset.
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